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Posted by on 18th Oct 2017 11:46am

An Aussie Recipe: The Pork Pie Floater

An Aussie Recipe: The Pork Pie Floater

Serves: 4, Prepare in: , Cook in:

Our eyes lit up when we saw this Australian tradition of a 'pie floater.' In general, if a recipe involves a pork pie, we'll try it. We do find that we love soup during the autumn/ winter months to warm us through on a cold lunch or dinner time. The problem is that soup never fills us up for long, and so we think this could be the solution - basically, it consists of a meat pie submerged in a bowl of thick pea soup. The soup gives you the warmth you want and the pie will fill you up and add flavour.


Ingredients
  • Vale of Mowbray pork pies – one of our mini pork pie would work wonderfully for this recipe!
  • 500g Blue boiler peas – the pea soup is traditionally made from Australian blue boiler peas but can be substituted with a variety called Marrowfat peas
  •  Chicken stock – 5 cups
  • Mint sauce/ ketchup/ brown sauce/ malt vinegar
Vale of Mowbray pork pies – one of our mini pork pie would work wonderfully for this recipe! 500g Blue boiler peas – the pea soup is traditionally made from Australian blue boiler peas but can be substituted with a variety called Marrowfat peas  Chicken stock – 5 cups Mint sauce/ ketchup/ brown sauce/ malt vinegar
Method

Before we start, it’s important to note that the method for this recipe begins the night before. The blue boiler peas need soaking overnight in order for you to get that thick yet smooth texture. They will double in size due to their increased water content overnight and so you need to have put them in a saucepan that’s big enough!

  1. When you’re ready, take your soaked peas and rinse them thoroughly a few times before draining
  2. In the same pan pan, add in the chicken stock, bringing this all to the boil. Turn down to a simmer and cook (stirring often) until the peas have softened and the soup is thick. This will take around 30-40 minutes.
  3. During the final 15-20 minutes of the soup cooking, place your pork pie in the oven and cook at 180°C until golden brown and piping hot
  4. Pour into four bowls and in the middle, place your pork pie. Traditionally, these pork pies are pushed upside down into the middle of the soup until submerged. Personally, we prefer them to be on top so they don’t become soggy and instead stay crispy and flakey after coming out of the oven.

Sauce wise, traditionally this dish is served with either mint sauce, tomato sauce, BBQ sauce or malt vinegar. Which would you try? We love peas and mint sauce so it’s a no-brainer for us!

Pie floaters were traditionally bought from street pie-carts as a late evening meal. The pie carts in Australia were typically trailers and carts which were horse drawn and had a window along either one or both sides which was wheeled around and parked at lunch and dinner times to meet the customer demand. Adelaide metropolitan area had pie carts since the 1870s and in 2003, the South Australian National Trust traced the pie floater back 130+ years.

We think this is such a great idea and can’t believe we’ve not tried it before. It’s practically a variation on our beloved Yorkshire pork pie and peas!

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